The Trump Effect, Vol. II: A Call for Unity

The unexpected election of Donald Trump into the highest office in American politics last week caused quite a stir amongst conspiracy theorists. By all metrics, Hillary Clinton was the clear New World Order candidate: she comes from a dynastic, deeply establishment family; she is a seasoned hawk; she is a committed progressive; she advocated mandatory vaccination; and she was committed to disarming the American population. Absolutely nothing Clinton stood could be interpreted as anti-establishment.

If you compare this to the campaign rhetoric of her victorious opponent, the enigmatic Donald Trump, much of which was highly controversial, directly challenging leftist establishment orthodoxy and proposing real, viable, workable solutions, then it seems pretty obvious whom it would benefit the establishment more to have residing in the White House. That having someone entirely in-line with what the NWO strives to achieve installed as the Chief Executive is expedient, self-evidently makes logical sense – a willing, devoted slave is far more desirable than one who has to be cajoled, bribed, or threatened into obedience, because his/her loyalty is far less conditional, and thus much easier to maintain.

Over the last week, I’ve been following very keenly the reactions of conspiracy theorists; there is much that I, as a fellow conspiracy theorist, find to disagree with. I find the alt-right position that Trump is embarking on a one-man crusade to liberate America from the hidden cabal, against seemingly insurmountable adversity and all the odds, completely unrealistic. Even if Trump were willing to do all of this, he is unable – he has not been appointed the supreme dictator of the USA; he has to work within the democratic political framework of that nation-state, with its emphasis on the separation of powers (and that is without mentioning the power of lobbyists and advisers, or the clout of the financial sector). I think that expecting Trump to be the glorious saviour of mankind that many people seem to be hoping for is extremely optimistic, and likely to lead to serious disappointment.

However, I also strongly disagree with the opposite opinion: that Trump winning is completely meaningless, that it is as desirable to the establishment as Clinton winning, that there is no ‘lesser of two evils’. I think that this viewpoint (which, judging from my experiences browsing various conspiracy forums, appears to be held mainly by left-wingers, as well as anarchists who believe evil begins and ends with the state) is not only despairingly pessimistic, but quite illogical – it relies upon the supposition that anyone who has even the tiniest amount of power or influence is with the Illuminati programme; something I just cannot agree with, because I do not believe the interwoven global networks of political and social control, and the various disputes and disagreements within, are all choreographed like some awful dance group on Britain’s Got Talent. One simple piece of logic that I like to remember is that if our hidden overlords were omnipotent and omniscient, they wouldn’t need to be hidden, would they? It’s easy to despair as a conspiracy theorist and think “we’re all doomed, they control 100% of everything”, but this is NOT true – we can still fight; and ‘they’ are not infallible gods – their schemes are not flawless, and their reach is not yet universal.

I said in the previous volume of my analysis of Trump’s victory that I believe Trump represents the fabled ‘lesser of two evils’ – a position I still wholeheartedly take. A Donald Trump presidency clearly represents different things than a Hillary Clinton presidency. Party political niceties dictate that Donald Trump cannot push anywhere near as aggressively to further the destructive liberal social policies that characterise our era; not only would the Republican Party savage him, but more crucially, it would completely shatter the already-fragile illusion of democracy, which is something the elite need to do, for the time being at least. What would it look like if a Republican president legalised partial-birth abortion, for instance, or repealed the Second Amendment? It would be obvious to even a blind fool that both political parties sing from exactly the same hymn sheet, and that would spell the end for the two-party system – something that at this point is not in the script.

I will go into this in depth in my final post on the election (due to be published within the next week), but it is important for other conspiracy theorists to understand also that, like myself, many conspiracy theorists are also social conservatives and Christians – we are a minority, for sure, but a significant one. Other issues may be more important to you, and that is fine – we are all entitled to our own opinion on which issues are the most urgent. But to us, the most important issues are the social issues: we are most deeply concerned with the proliferation of abortion, the aggressive LGBT persecution of religious people, with the destruction of the family unit, with the deregulation of sex, and with the malignant tumour that is pornography. Most of us believe that even if Trump does not substantially ameliorate these social evils, that he will not make them worse – or at least, he will not make them worse to the extent that Hillary Clinton would have. If you are concerned chiefly with economics, or with foreign policy, or the political structure, that is fine; but these are secondary interests for us, and as far as we religious conservatives can see, we have just won ourselves a temporary reprieve from the vicious, coordinated assault on our beloved traditional culture.

For me, the important thing to remember is that whatever we as conspiracy theorists say, we are outsiders, we are not party to any plans that may exist for Trump’s presidency, and so it is all speculation. We conspiracy theorists, of all stripes, are very opinionated people. Though we are (usually) more civilised and polite in our modes of expression than our mainstream friends, a resolute, determined fire burns within us all: we wouldn’t be conspiracy theorists if we couldn’t stand our ground in the face of verbal hammerings! I think that sometimes – myself included – we can become almost single-minded, even to the point of self-important arrogance. Genuine conviction in one’s beliefs is always a positive thing, but I do not think it is at all helpful to (as one conspiracy theorist I debated online repeatedly did) deride people, either tacitly calling them stupid, or explicitly calling them “sheep” (a term I loathe), simply for not subscribing to our individual positions. All this furious screaming at Trump voters and supporters to “wake up, you stupid sheep, Trump is just as bad!” is only likely to alienate them; in fact, it is simply a variation of the angry, demented howling of the wounded mainstream left that we’re all quite sick of. You might be convinced of the veracity of your opinions, but that never confers the right to silence others who hold theirs.

So please, conspiracy theorists – let’s discuss our differences of opinion on Donald Trump. Let’s openly and honestly disagree with each other – but let’s not get angry or contemptuous with each other. Some of us do not believe that Trump and Clinton are indistinguishable, and it is not because we are half-asleep sheep; it is because we have used our God-given intellects to examine the situation, with our personal values and beliefs in mind, and we have arrived at a different conclusion than those who believe Trump is either a saviour or, effectively, a Clinton clone; a conclusion that is no less valid than anyone else’s.

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